Archive for category roseto

Child porn suspect is 1st arrest announced by new Bethlehem Internet squad

Police Chief Mark DiLuzio rolled out the new unit publicly and announced charges against a 43-year-old Slate Belt man.

Bethlehem police Thursday announced a new Internet Cri…

Easton drug felon picked up on alleged parole violation

Two other people are also taken into custody on warrants by the Northampton County Sheriff’s Department.

A 22-year-old Easton man was arrested Tuesday by Northampton County sheriffs after allegedly violating his parole in a 2013 drug case.

Freddie GarciaFreddie Garcia, 22, of Easton, was arrested Dec. 6, 2016, by Northampton County Sheriff’s deputies. (Courtesy photo | For lehighvalleylive.com) 

Freddie Salvator Garcia, of the 600 block of Northampton Street, was picked up at home and taken to Northampton County Prison, where he remained Thursday, authorities say.

Garcia was initially charged on May 23, 2013, and faced two counts of possession with intent to deliver drugs, three counts of possession of a controlled substance, two counts of conspiracy and single counts of possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia, court papers say.

He pleaded guilty Nov. 26 of that year to a singe count of possession with intent to deliver drugs and was sentenced to 3 to 23 months in prison, followed by 2 years of probation, court papers say. He got credit for time served and was paroled Jan. 9, 2014, records show.

His parole was questioned three times before a Nov. 10, 2016, hearing led to a bench warrant for his arrest, which the sheriffs executed on Tuesday, authorities said.

Also on Tuesday, the sheriff’s department’s Criminal Warrants Division arrested:

  • Sarah A. ZiegenfussSarah A. Ziegenfuss, 36, of Roseto, and Michael Burr, 32, were arrested Dec. 6, 2016, by Northampton County Sheriff’s deputies. (Courtesy photos | For lehighvalleylive.com) 

    Sarah A. Ziegenfuss, 36, of the 700 block of Garibaldi Avenue in Roseto on a bench warrant involving possession of drug paraphernalia. She remained jailed on Thursday morning, records show.

  • Michael Burr, 32, of the 200 block of Main Street in Bangor, on two domestic relations warrants. He remained jailed on Thursday morning, records show.

Tony Rhodin may be reached at arhodin@lehighvalleylive.com. Follow him on Twitter @TonyRhodin. Find lehighvalleylive.com on Facebook.

 

Motorcyclist killed in Route 512 accident identified

The 47-year-old man was fatally injured in a crash that also involved a pickup truck, authorities said.

A motorcyclist from Roseto was killed in a two-vehicle crash Wednesday aft…

Is it time for another regional police force in Slate Belt?

Some officials are discussing combining police forces in Bangor and two other boroughs.

Some officials are warming to the idea of adding a third regional police force to Northamp…

Slate Belt couple accused of neglecting dog for years

Plainfield Township police in January 2015 found the frail dog running loose in an intersection.

A husband and wife from Roseto are accused of tying up a dog for years outsi…

How a tiny Pennsylvania town held the secrets to long life

More than 50 years after documentation of the “Roseto Effect,” an Easton physician found a patient who embodied it.

In spite of the dark suits and solemn hymns at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, there was a celebratory tone to the funeral for Carmen Ruggiero.

Ruggiero was born in tiny Roseto on Jan. 21, 1912, the year the Titanic sank and the year in which leaders incorporated the predominantly Italian-American borough near the tip of the Lehigh Valley.

The man nicknamed “Armie” died Dec. 20, a month shy of his 104th birthday.

At the time, he was believed to be the oldest living Rosetan and one of the last alive to have participated in a landmark 1950s study that tied good health and long life to the close-knit Italian family structure defined by the town.

Carmen 'Armie' Ruggiero at his 100th birthday partyCarmen “Armie” Ruggiero at his 100th birthday party in January 2012 at Stroudsmoor Country Inn in Monroe County. (Courtesy photo) 

“Everybody firmly believed he had a long, good life and he went the way he wanted to go,” said his nephew Sam Nittle, of Wind Gap. “He lived life to the fullest and had no regrets about anything. He was the patriarch of the family.”

Ruggiero was one of 11 children and never married or had kids of his own.

He worked at clubs and taverns, tending bar at popular watering holes like the Buckhorn and Luigi’s Ranch-O outside Belvidere and running the bar service at Florida hotspots such as the Boca Raton Resort and Hollywood Beach Hotel.

His life and outlook came under special interest by Dr. Mahesh Krishnamurthy, an Easton Hospital specialist in internal medicine. The doctor’s fascination with the so-called “Roseto Effect” blossomed after first treating Ruggiero about two years ago.

Ruggiero, he said, was a special patient.

“He was happy with very little,” said Krishnamurthy, program director of the internal medicine residency program at Easton. “I believe that’s key. When you feel contented with what you have as opposed to always reaching for the sky and keeping up with your neighbor, it was a lesson learned.

“To me his story was told in four words: happy with very little.”

The Roseto Effect

Movies have been made and books written about the secrets of longevity. In 1964, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association hit upon an astonishing find in the hilly town in Northampton County.

A University of Oklahoma physician, Dr. Stewart Wolf, studied the effect of social structure on health from 1955 to 1961. He concluded that Roseto’s low rate of heart attacks and mortality compared to the rest of the region and the nation was attributable to the close-knit community and generations under one roof typical of Roseto at the time.

Roseto produced such results despite health risk factors that were all around: jugs of homemade red wine, foods cooked in lard, the smoking of cigars.

Fifty-five years later, Krishnamurthy encountered living proof that there must be something to the hypothesis and believes it might be applied to centenarians in general.

Dr. Mahesh KrishnamurthyDr. Mahesh Krishnamurthy (Courtesy photo)  

An article he wrote with a colleague, Dr. Raafia Memon, after spending time with Ruggiero notes that nearly 20 percent of the 55,000 100-year-olds in the U.S. in 2014 lived below the poverty line.

“These people have very little income but they have an attitude to life that is phenomenal,” Krishnamurthy said. “Mr. Ruggiero told me that’s how you live a happy life and a long life.

“The moment you start stressing about things, he said, is when the problems come. He believed that being happy with very little was the secret to longevity.

“Once people are older, they are very contented people,” Krishnamurthy said. “I can’t prove it based on the life story of one person, but I have seen it in people like him who don’t have a gloomy attitude and aren’t ticked off about small things. I do believe that there is something to it.”

Proud of his independence

Most of Ruggiero’s siblings lived into their 80s and 90s. He moved to Florida in the late 1960s then came back in the 1990s to help tend to two of his sisters, said niece Kathie Marinucci, of Roseto.

He maintained a fierce independence and lived the past few years at the Walden III assisted-living facility in Wind Gap.

Ruggiero drove until he was 100, could recall stories from his childhood in vivid detail and passed along traditions to his many nieces and nephews that they say would be lost forever were it not for his insistence.

With decades in the service industry, for example, he prided himself on his Caesar salad.

“It had to have the 13 ingredients,” said Marinucci, who lives in the house where she grew up. “You had to use the wooden bowl, which you never washed, and you had to smash the anchovies.”

Marinucci and Nittle are brother and sister whose late mother, Rose Nittle, was the youngest of Ruggiero’s family. While they looked after their uncle Armie, he lived essentially on his own up until the end.

One day last month, he called Nittle at home and summoned him to Walden III.

“I need you to come and see me,” he said.

Nittle said Ruggiero was uncharacteristically serious and business-minded that day. He pointed a crooked finger at his nephew and shook it at him.

“He said ‘This is my home now,'” a surprised Nittle recalled.

“He said ‘I had a home in Florida and don’t have it anymore. I had a home in Roseto and don’t have that anymore. This is my home. I go and come as I please.

“‘Don’t you ever put me in a home and don’t you ever let people see me if I can’t take care of myself.'”

Ruggiero also related something that Nittle says he can’t explain today. The family traditionally gathers at Nittle’s home on Christmas Eve and the nephew makes Manhattans.

“He said, ‘I don’t want you to feel bad about this, but I’m not coming over this year for Christmas,'” Nittle said.

A few hours after leaving, NIttle got a call from his sister. Ruggiero had taken a fall in the dining area and was going to Lehigh Valley Hospital. Doctors said he had fractured his neck in the spill.

Ruggiero died of bronchial pneumonia about 10 days later, his family said.

“The day this all happened, which was the beginning of the end, is the day he called me and told me all this,” Nittle said.

A different time

Roseto is different today than the town that gained recognition for its endurance. About 1,500 people live there, but the concentration of Italian-Americans has been diluted.

In 1989, Dr. Wolf restudied the Roseto Effect and found the mortality rates were in line with other communities such as Bangor and Nazareth. The difference was gone.

“The Rosetan values of cohesive family structure started fading away in the late 1960s,” Dr. Krishnamurthy said.

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in RosetoOur Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in Roseto has been the place of worship for generations of the borough’s Italian-Americans. (Jim Deegan | For lehighvalleylive.com)  

Even today, the mayor and most of borough council have last names, like the streets, that end in vowels. But it’s not the place it was, according to longtime residents.

“Back then everybody knew everyone else,” said Michael Romano, 62, the borough council president. “If you walked down the street and you were doing something wrong, the parents didn’t have a problem disciplining someone else’s child. It’s not that way today.”

You can still get tomato pie and cannoli at Roseto Bakery, formerly LeDonne’s, and there’s Italian fare and espresso machines for sale at Ruggiero’s Market on Dante Street. But the days when Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church was packed and Catholic schools were open have faded like the Roseto Effect.

Romano said the Italian-American culture that emphasized education and college served to diminish the effect.

“There’s still a core of Italians with the church and the fire company, but the composition of Roseto has changed,” he said.

Doc looks back on colorful 57-year career

While the Roseto Effect may be long gone, its documentation remains useful, according to Easton Hospital’s Krishnamurthy.

He feels grateful to have been able to capture a fleeting phenomenon in Carmen Ruggiero and his stories of Roseto.

“All of my patients are equal because I care for their medical conditions,” he said, “but sometimes there are cases that speak to you much more.

“He had a profound effect on me,” he said of Ruggiero. “There was a different connection. He would make you so comfortable and you could talk to him for hours and not even realize it.”

With further study involving other centenarians, Krishnamurthy hopes to one day publish a medical paper that ties attitude and longevity together.

It’s something he says is worthy of emphasis.

“We’re going through tough times all across the world,” he said. “I see a lot of discontentment in the youth of today and I don’t know how to change that.”

An old man from Roseto who didn’t drive anymore still may have held the keys.

“There’s something about the centenarians who find joy in small things,” the doctor said. “They find a purpose in life. We need to find some level of happiness and contentment with what we are and who we are.

“For me, it is going to be a lifelong quest.”

Jim Deegan may be reached at jdeegan@lehighvalleylive.com. Follow him on Twitter @jim_deegan. Find lehighvalleylive on Facebook.

How a tiny Pennsylvania town held the secrets to long life

More than 50 years after documentation of the “Roseto Effect,” an Easton physician found a patient who embodied it.

In spite of the dark suits and solemn hymns at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, there was a celebratory tone to the funeral for Carmen Ruggiero.

Ruggiero was born in tiny Roseto on Jan. 21, 1912, the year the Titanic sank and the year in which leaders incorporated the predominantly Italian-American borough near the tip of the Lehigh Valley.

The man nicknamed “Armie” died Dec. 20, a month shy of his 104th birthday.

At the time, he was believed to be the oldest living Rosetan and one of the last alive to have participated in a landmark 1950s study that tied good health and long life to the close-knit Italian family structure defined by the town.

Carmen 'Armie' Ruggiero at his 100th birthday partyCarmen “Armie” Ruggiero at his 100th birthday party in January 2012 at Stroudsmoor Country Inn in Monroe County. (Courtesy photo) 

“Everybody firmly believed he had a long, good life and he went the way he wanted to go,” said his nephew Sam Nittle, of Wind Gap. “He lived life to the fullest and had no regrets about anything. He was the patriarch of the family.”

Ruggiero was one of 11 children and never married or had kids of his own.

He worked at clubs and taverns, tending bar at popular watering holes like the Buckhorn and Luigi’s Ranch-O outside Belvidere and running the bar service at Florida hotspots such as the Boca Raton Resort and Hollywood Beach Hotel.

His life and outlook came under special interest by Dr. Mahesh Krishnamurthy, an Easton Hospital specialist in internal medicine. The doctor’s fascination with the so-called “Roseto Effect” blossomed after first treating Ruggiero about two years ago.

Ruggiero, he said, was a special patient.

“He was happy with very little,” said Krishnamurthy, program director of the internal medicine residency program at Easton. “I believe that’s key. When you feel contented with what you have as opposed to always reaching for the sky and keeping up with your neighbor, it was a lesson learned.

“To me his story was told in four words: happy with very little.”

The Roseto Effect

Movies have been made and books written about the secrets of longevity. In 1964, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association hit upon an astonishing find in the hilly town in Northampton County.

A University of Oklahoma physician, Dr. Stewart Wolf, studied the effect of social structure on health from 1955 to 1961. He concluded that Roseto’s low rate of heart attacks and mortality compared to the rest of the region and the nation was attributable to the close-knit community and generations under one roof typical of Roseto at the time.

Roseto produced such results despite health risk factors that were all around: jugs of homemade red wine, foods cooked in lard, the smoking of cigars.

Fifty-five years later, Krishnamurthy encountered living proof that there must be something to the hypothesis and believes it might be applied to centenarians in general.

Dr. Mahesh KrishnamurthyDr. Mahesh Krishnamurthy (Courtesy photo)  

An article he wrote with a colleague, Dr. Raafia Memon, after spending time with Ruggiero notes that nearly 20 percent of the 55,000 100-year-olds in the U.S. in 2014 lived below the poverty line.

“These people have very little income but they have an attitude to life that is phenomenal,” Krishnamurthy said. “Mr. Ruggiero told me that’s how you live a happy life and a long life.

“The moment you start stressing about things, he said, is when the problems come. He believed that being happy with very little was the secret to longevity.

“Once people are older, they are very contented people,” Krishnamurthy said. “I can’t prove it based on the life story of one person, but I have seen it in people like him who don’t have a gloomy attitude and aren’t ticked off about small things. I do believe that there is something to it.”

Proud of his independence

Most of Ruggiero’s siblings lived into their 80s and 90s. He moved to Florida in the late 1960s then came back in the 1990s to help tend to two of his sisters, said niece Kathie Marinucci, of Roseto.

He maintained a fierce independence and lived the past few years at the Walden III assisted-living facility in Wind Gap.

Ruggiero drove until he was 100, could recall stories from his childhood in vivid detail and passed along traditions to his many nieces and nephews that they say would be lost forever were it not for his insistence.

With decades in the service industry, for example, he prided himself on his Caesar salad.

“It had to have the 13 ingredients,” said Marinucci, who lives in the house where she grew up. “You had to use the wooden bowl, which you never washed, and you had to smash the anchovies.”

Marinucci and Nittle are brother and sister whose late mother, Rose Nittle, was the youngest of Ruggiero’s family. While they looked after their uncle Armie, he lived essentially on his own up until the end.

One day last month, he called Nittle at home and summoned him to Walden III.

“I need you to come and see me,” he said.

Nittle said Ruggiero was uncharacteristically serious and business-minded that day. He pointed a crooked finger at his nephew and shook it at him.

“He said ‘This is my home now,'” a surprised Nittle recalled.

“He said ‘I had a home in Florida and don’t have it anymore. I had a home in Roseto and don’t have that anymore. This is my home. I go and come as I please.

“‘Don’t you ever put me in a home and don’t you ever let people see me if I can’t take care of myself.'”

Ruggiero also related something that Nittle says he can’t explain today. The family traditionally gathers at Nittle’s home on Christmas Eve and the nephew makes Manhattans.

“He said, ‘I don’t want you to feel bad about this, but I’m not coming over this year for Christmas,'” Nittle said.

A few hours after leaving, NIttle got a call from his sister. Ruggiero had taken a fall in the dining area and was going to Lehigh Valley Hospital. Doctors said he had fractured his neck in the spill.

Ruggiero died of bronchial pneumonia about 10 days later, his family said.

“The day this all happened, which was the beginning of the end, is the day he called me and told me all this,” Nittle said.

A different time

Roseto is different today than the town that gained recognition for its endurance. About 1,500 people live there, but the concentration of Italian-Americans has been diluted.

In 1989, Dr. Wolf restudied the Roseto Effect and found the mortality rates were in line with other communities such as Bangor and Nazareth. The difference was gone.

“The Rosetan values of cohesive family structure started fading away in the late 1960s,” Dr. Krishnamurthy said.

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in RosetoOur Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in Roseto has been the place of worship for generations of the borough’s Italian-Americans. (Jim Deegan | For lehighvalleylive.com)  

Even today, the mayor and most of borough council have last names, like the streets, that end in vowels. But it’s not the place it was, according to longtime residents.

“Back then everybody knew everyone else,” said Michael Romano, 62, the borough council president. “If you walked down the street and you were doing something wrong, the parents didn’t have a problem disciplining someone else’s child. It’s not that way today.”

You can still get tomato pie and cannoli at Roseto Bakery, formerly LeDonne’s, and there’s Italian fare and espresso machines for sale at Ruggiero’s Market on Dante Street. But the days when Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church was packed and Catholic schools were open have faded like the Roseto Effect.

Romano said the Italian-American culture that emphasized education and college served to diminish the effect.

“There’s still a core of Italians with the church and the fire company, but the composition of Roseto has changed,” he said.

Doc looks back on colorful 57-year career

While the Roseto Effect may be long gone, its documentation remains useful, according to Easton Hospital’s Krishnamurthy.

He feels grateful to have been able to capture a fleeting phenomenon in Carmen Ruggiero and his stories of Roseto.

“All of my patients are equal because I care for their medical conditions,” he said, “but sometimes there are cases that speak to you much more.

“He had a profound effect on me,” he said of Ruggiero. “There was a different connection. He would make you so comfortable and you could talk to him for hours and not even realize it.”

With further study involving other centenarians, Krishnamurthy hopes to one day publish a medical paper that ties attitude and longevity together.

It’s something he says is worthy of emphasis.

“We’re going through tough times all across the world,” he said. “I see a lot of discontentment in the youth of today and I don’t know how to change that.”

An old man from Roseto who didn’t drive anymore still may have held the keys.

“There’s something about the centenarians who find joy in small things,” the doctor said. “They find a purpose in life. We need to find some level of happiness and contentment with what we are and who we are.

“For me, it is going to be a lifelong quest.”

Jim Deegan may be reached at jdeegan@lehighvalleylive.com. Follow him on Twitter @jim_deegan. Find lehighvalleylive on Facebook.

Funeral services announced for hunters killed in crash

Northampton County residents Timothy D. Gerhard, Barry A. Foose Jr. and Eric J. “Bubba” Dunbar were passengers in a 2014 Ford F-150 that crashed Sunday.

Funeral services have been announced for two of the three Northampton County men killed in a single-vehicle crash Sunday afternoon in Pike County.

Funeral services announced for hunters killed in crashFrom left, Timothy Gerhard, Barry Foose Jr. and Eric “Bubba” Dunbar (Courtesy photos | For lehighvalleylive.com) 

Timothy D. Gerhard, 58, of Plainfield Township, Barry A. Foose Jr., 46, of Easton, and Eric J. “Bubba” Dunbar, 38, of Roseto, were passengers in a 2014 Ford F-150 driven by Thomas J. Howey Jr., 49, of Palmer Township.

Hunters in fatal wreck recalled as hard-working family men

The pickup truck veered off Mozette Road in rural Greene Township and struck a tree. Gerhard, Foose and Dunbar were pronounced dead at the scene of their injuries. Howey was flown to Lehigh Valley Hospital, Salisbury Township, where he remained Wednesday in critical condition.

Hunter killed in crash recalled as generous, fun-loving

Pennsylvania State Police at Blooming Grove said they were continuing Wednesday to investigate the crash. The four were planning to spend time at Howey’s hunting cabin as Pennsylvania’s firearms season for white-tailed deer got underway Monday.

None of the four was wearing a seat belt when the crash occurred, police said. 

Gerhard was a father of two and a grandfather, who celebrated his 39th wedding anniversary in April, according to his obituary. He worked as plant manager of Asbury Graphite Mills Inc. in Franklin Township, Warren County. Services will be private.

Foose was also a married father of two and a grandfather, his obituary states. He was a packer at Crayola in Forks Township. Friends and family may call beginning at 5 p.m. Friday at Rupell Funeral Home, 465 Memorial Parkway (Route 22) in Phillipsburg, where the funeral follows at 7 p.m.

Dunbar, a veteran of the U.S. Army, lived with his wife of 10 years and their two dogs. According to his obituary, friends may call beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday at Rupell Funeral Home, where the funeral is scheduled for noon.

Kurt Bresswein may be reached at kbresswein@lehighvalleylive.com. Follow him on Twitter @KurtBresswein. Find lehighvalleylive.com on Facebook.

Hunter killed in crash recalled as generous, fun-loving family man

Eric “Bubba”  Dunbar, 38, of Roseto, was killed Sunday along with 46-year-old Barry Foose, of Easton, and 58-year-old Timothy Gerhard, of Plainfield Township.

Eric “Bubba” Dunbar was a generous, fun-loving man who adored his family, his widow said Tuesday.

This was to be the 38-year-old’s first trip to Palmer Township resident Thomas J. Howey Jr.’s hunting cabin in Pike County, Donell Dunbar said. Bubba Dunbar used to take 46-year-old Barry Foose, of Easton, hunting near where he grew up, in Warren County, Pennsylvania. 

They hadn’t gotten out the past year or two and decided to join in Howey’s trip to hunt deer during Pennsylvania’s firearms season that opened Monday.

Howey drove Bubba Dunbar along with Foose, of Easton, and 58-year-old Timothy Gerhard, of Plainfield Township, leaving Sunday morning, family members said. A single-vehicle crash Sunday afternoon left Howey seriously injured and his passengers dead, authorities said. 

The Pike County Coroner’s Office ruled the deaths accidental, caused by multiple blunt-force trauma. Flown for treatment to Lehigh Valley Hospital, Salisbury Township, Howey was in critical condition Tuesday, authorities said.

Hunters in fatal wreck recalled as hard-working family men

Bubba and Donell Dunbar met at her brother’s wedding, and the couple celebrated their own nuptials in September 2005.

“He moved down here and it just kind of blossomed from there,” Donell Dunbar said. “He was like my soul mate.”

The Dunbars lived in Roseto, said Donell, a 1996 Phillipsburg High School graduate.

Eric "Bubba" DunbarEric “Bubba” Dunbar is seen in a Facebook photo in Italy, during this time with the U.S. Army. (Courtesy photo | For lehighvalleylive.com) 

A veteran of the U.S. Army from the late 1990s, Bubba Dunbar worked at Schutt Reconditioning in Palmer Township, starting in 2010, his widow said. That’s where he got his nickname, his widow said.

“Somebody at work said he looked like Bubba Sparxxx,” Donell said, referring to the hip-hop artist from Georgia.

The couple’s two dogs, Xena the Rottweiler-Italian mastiff mix and Diesel the Great Dane-bull mastiff, were like their children, Donell said. 

Bubba Dunbar was a loving person, who wouldn’t hesitate to help those he loved, according to his widow.

“He would have given his shirt off his back for everybody,” she said.

Donell said their relationship was on another level compared to others, and Bubba Dunbar enjoyed the friendly ribbing he’d get from her and others.

“Everybody kind of like picked on him, not in like a bad way, but he would joke around and kind of go along with it,” she said.

The two took ceramics together at Aura in Easton, and Bubba Dunbar also loved playing role-playing video games, Donell said.

He also stayed close with his family, especially his mother, Rose Jackson, and brother, Daniel Dunbar, who still live in Warren County, Pennsylvania. Donell said she and her husband planned to visit them for Christmas.

He was predeceased by his stepfather, Robert Jackson, who raised him, and sister, Vickie Hussey, who was also killed in a car crash.

“He loved his nieces and nephews,” Donell said. “Family was a big part of his life.”

Donell said she is working with Rupell Funeral Home on arrangements for services. 

Kurt Bresswein may be reached at kbresswein@lehighvalleylive.com. Follow him on Twitter @KurtBresswein. Find lehighvalleylive.com on Facebook.

Deadly Crash in Monroe County

HAMILTON TOWNSHIP — A man from Northampton County has died after a motorcycle crash in Monroe County. Troopers say Phillip Caiazzo, 50 of Roseto, was thrown from the bike on Route 33 near Snydersville around 9:30 Friday night. According to state police, Caiazzo hit a piece of debris and was thrown from the bike. He […]